Penetration Testing
How to deal with the company that doesn't react on providing them information about serious security vulnerability? Jul 23 2014 10:06AM
MichaĆ? RybiĆ?ski (fishmanos79 gmail com) (2 replies)
Re: How to deal with the company that doesn't react on providing them information about serious security vulnerability? Jul 26 2014 09:08AM
Dolev Farhi (dolevf yahoo com)
Hi,
If I were you, I wouldn't post this in fulldisclosure, at all. This is
due to the harm it may cause the involved and uninformed innocent
people, as you described.
If the company doesn't respond to emails try to look for official
channels: Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin? and send an informing message via
those channels.
There is always some kind of way.
If there is absolutely no way of contacting them, try contacting the
host provider or something. I definitely think exposing this while in a
vulnerable state is irresponsible.

------ Original Message ------
From: "MichaÅ? RybiÅ?ski" <fishmanos79 (at) gmail (dot) com [email concealed]>
To: pen-test (at) securityfocus (dot) com [email concealed]
Sent: 7/23/2014 1:06:29 PM
Subject: How to deal with the company that doesn't react on providing
them information about serious security vulnerability?

>Hi all,
>
>I believe this is the best place to ask such question because I would
>imagine that most of people reading this list have something to do
>with discovering vulnerabilities and reporting them to parties
>responsible.
>
>On the beginning of the January I have discovered some security flaw
>which allows basically anyone to access all personal client's data
>(full name, full address, email address and a few more) of one of the
>most known Internet IT magazine.
>Although I have sent information about it to 3 different contact email
>addresses in the two months time span, the only thing I got in return
>was information that "We have received your email and have forwarded
>it to our main office to review and advise." received on 1st of April.
>Since then I haven't heard from them at all.
>
>The easiest action I can think of is to just make a full disclosure of
>the flaw and wait for the reaction but because this would allow almost
>anyone to access personal data of tenths if not hundreds thousands of
>subscribers (including me), I'd rather not do that...
>
>Could anyone of you propose what would be the best solution in this
>case or maybe generally this subject can be the start for the more
>general question - what should be done with the companies that doesn't
>react on such information sent?
>
>Many thanks
>MR
>
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