Security Basics
Re: nmap root vs user question Oct 14 2013 10:58PM
ToddAndMargo (ToddAndMargo zoho com)

>> On Fri, Oct 4, 2013 at 5:29 PM, ToddAndMargo <ToddAndMargo (at) zoho (dot) com [email concealed]
>> <mailto:ToddAndMargo (at) zoho (dot) com [email concealed]>> wrote:
>>
>> Hi All,
>>
>> "#" is my "root" prompt and "$" is my user prompt.
>>
>> Question: why does namp sometimes work as root
>> and not as a user? Why no warning that a command
>> has to be run as root?
>>
>>
>> This works as root:
>> # nmap -p T:5020,5900 192.168.202.210
>> Starting Nmap 6.40 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2013-10-04 14:25 PDT
>> Nmap scan report for 192.168.202.210
>> Host is up (0.00063s latency).
>> PORT STATE SERVICE
>> 5020/tcp filtered zenginkyo-1
>> 5900/tcp filtered vnc
>>
>> Same command does not work as a user:
>> $ nmap -p T:5020,5900 192.168.202.210
>> Starting Nmap 6.40 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2013-10-04 14:25 PDT
>> Note: Host seems down. If it is really up, but blocking our
>> ping probes, try -Pn
>>
>>
>> Many thanks,
>> -T

On 10/07/2013 06:26 AM, Duane Dunston wrote:
> NMAP has a discussion about this issue:
http://nmap.org/bennieston-tutorial/
>
> As a normal user, nmap uses the connect() method with scans. As root,
> it can make use of raw sockets and other methods to craft TCP/IP
> packets, but those functions require root access.
>
> Regarding the no warning, it requires understanding the operating
> system, the application you are running and what has to run in
> privileged mode or non-privileged mode considering both of those
> factors. Also factors such as files and directories that are
> written/open during the applications execution may play a factor, as
well.

Hi Duane,

Makes sense now. nmap tries to use what tools it has at
its disposal and doesn't complain about the lack thereof.

Thank you!

-T

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