Crypto
AES Dec 14 2007 10:44AM
Cristian Serban (scrissti gmail com) (3 replies)
Re: AES Dec 18 2007 10:15AM
Alexander Klimov (alserkli inbox ru) (1 replies)
Re: AES Dec 21 2007 08:32AM
Cristian Serban (scrissti gmail com) (2 replies)
Re: AES Dec 23 2007 09:50AM
Alexander Klimov (alserkli inbox ru)
Re: AES Dec 21 2007 05:11PM
Cosmin Stejerean (cstejerean gmail com) (1 replies)
Re: AES Dec 24 2007 02:21PM
donsmall3 cox net
Re: AES Dec 14 2007 11:29AM
Brad Hards (bradh frogmouth net) (1 replies)
Re: AES Dec 14 2007 01:49PM
Cristian Serban (scrissti gmail com) (1 replies)
RE: AES Dec 14 2007 02:52PM
Geoff Choo (geoff choo zonnet nl) (2 replies)
RE: AES Dec 14 2007 06:00PM
Zulfikar Ramzan (Zulfikar_Ramzan symantec com)
Re: AES Dec 14 2007 03:44PM
Cristian Serban (scrissti gmail com)
ok, about brute-forcing i thought it's like that
but i was hoping for something in the direction of "known plain text attack",
but if you say AES stands good against this, i won't go home and try
to reverse engineer the AES algorithm.

Cheers,

On Dec 14, 2007 4:52 PM, Geoff Choo <geoff.choo (at) zonnet (dot) nl [email concealed]> wrote:
> Cristian,
>
> From what I know of AES (http://www.cryptosystem.net/aes/), it should be
> able to withstand most practical cryptanalysis attacks when means that for
> the meantime, a brute force attack appears to be the most efficient key
> recovery attack on AES.
>
> However, even if you find a suitable crypto brute force tool, I hope you
> understand what it means to brute force a key at least 128 bits long.
> Keylength.com gives a good indication how long certain key lengths will
> afford protection. E.g. according to NIST, a 128 bit AES key should be
> sufficiently secure against mathematical attacks beyond 2030. This means
> that depending on how much computing power you have, I think it's still
> going to take you anywhere from 20 to 40 years to brute force a 128 bit key.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: listbounce (at) securityfocus (dot) com [email concealed] [mailto:listbounce (at) securityfocus (dot) com [email concealed]] On
> Behalf Of Cristian Serban
> Sent: 14 December 2007 14:50
> Cc: crypto (at) securityfocus (dot) com [email concealed]
> Subject: Re: AES
>
> Thank you very much guys.
> I'll have to digg a little bit to get more familliar with this kind of
> attack.
>
> Cristian
> On Dec 14, 2007 1:29 PM, Brad Hards <bradh (at) frogmouth (dot) net [email concealed]> wrote:
> > On Friday 14 December 2007 09:44:49 pm Cristian Serban wrote:
> > > Hi guys and girls,
> > > I have a quick question, and i thought you might know.
> > > Do you know if it's possible to find the encryption key if i have a
> > > file both encrypted and unencrypted using AES?
> > This type of attack is known as "known plaintext attack".
> >
> > > Do you know any tool that does brute forcing on specified algorithms?
> > There are brute force attacks, but I'm not aware of anything that would be
> > significant against AES. See wikipedia for a bunch of references.
> >
> > For some algos, you might look at http://www.distributed.net/source/
> >
> > Brad
> >
> >
>
>
>
> --
> Cristian
>
>

--
Cristian

[ reply ]
R: AES Dec 14 2007 11:12AM
Marco Ceriani (marco ceriani shareunit it)


 

Privacy Statement
Copyright 2010, SecurityFocus